VASCD Journal

Journal 2015

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Marsha L. Carr, DM Dr. Marsha L. Carr, a National Milken Educator, Teacher of the Year, and Fulbright Specialist, is on the faculty at UNCW after previously serving a decade as a school superintendent. Owner of Edu-Tell, LLC, she is an international consultant to business and education on self-mentoring™ and author of Self-Mentoring: The Invisible Leader. (www.selfmentoring.net) Carr can be reached at selfmentoring@selfmentoring.net or follow her on twitter www.twitter.com/doccarr Audrey Martin-McCoy, Ph.D. Serving as a high school social studies teacher for several years, Dr. Martin-McCoy has continued her commitment to public service through work in the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, the North Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, and North Carolina State University. Her entire professional career has been dedicated to education, serving in the roles of teacher, education licensure consultant, curriculum developer/project coordinator, education assessment consultant, and presently, a state education policy analyst. She can be reached at audrey.mccoy02@yahoo.com Using Poverty Simulations To Teach Sensitivity: How High School Teachers Respond To e Importance Of Poverty Training Living in poverty can present conditions of frustration, anxiety, and hopelessness that individuals, without some personal experience or exposure to these circumstances, simply cannot understand. In order for teachers and administrators who lead our classrooms to fully understand and become aware, authentic models of exposure are designed for training and staff development. High school teachers, participating in a poverty simulation professional development, were the focus of this study to answer these questions: What do the participants learn from the activity and how do high school teachers respond to the importance of poverty training and apply this experience to classroom situations? The high school teachers agreed that poverty simulations are not only a valuable tool to provide educators with poverty rules and challenges, but the training carries over into classroom instruction. vaascd.org Virginia Educational Leadership Vol. 12 2015 106

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